Hydroxyapatite Formation on Coated Ti Submerged in SBF

Tatiana Aviles

Authors:  Tatiana Aviles, ShuMin Hsu, Josephine Esquivel-Upshaw, Patrick H. Carey IV, Arthur Clark, Fan Ren, Chaker Fares

Faculty Mentor:  Josephine Esquivel-Upshaw 

College:  College of Dentistry

Abstract

Titanium implants are commonly used in the field of dentistry for prosthetics to replace missing teeth. For successful therapy, the implant must bind to the surrounding bone (osseointegrate) to achieve stability of the prosthesis. The objective for this ongoing study is to determine the success of different implant coating in providing optimal osseointegration through the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA). Hydroxyapatite serves as a scaffolding for the bone to build on and can facilitate bone development. Quaternized titanium nitride (Q. TiN), titanium nitride (TiN), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) coatings were deposited onto 3mm titanium discs using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Two additional discs were tested, one after 24 hours of submersion in sodium hydroxide (NaOH)and the other a pure titanium disc as a control group. Each sample was submerged in simulated body fluid (SBF), replenished every 48 hours, over a period of 28 days. The extent of hydroxyapatite formation, mass, depth, and composition were studied using a digital microscopy system, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis x-rays (EDAX).

Poster Pitch

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Poster

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Tatiana Aviles
Tatiana Aviles (@guest_78)
1 year ago

Hello, thank you for visiting our research page! Feel free to chat with me via Zoom through the following URL if you have any questions.
https://ufl.zoom.us/j/999962598

Julia Volpi
Julia Volpi (@guest_1960)
1 year ago

Hi Tatiana! You did an amazing job on your poster and your research sounds so interesting. I had a question on if there was any specific reason you decided to use the size 9.5 x 3mm for your experiement? Thanks!

Anonymous
Anonymous (@guest_7766)
Reply to  Julia Volpi
1 year ago

Hello Julia, so we actually made a few modifications with this experiment. Originally we started by coating glass plates, but we did not see similar results than when we used Titanium. Furthermore, we ended up using titanium because that is representative of the implant bases used in vitro conditions. We went with a 3mm thick disks to ensure enough surface area for HA growth as well as to allow the samples to be polished some.

Tatiana Aviles
Tatiana Aviles (@guest_7770)
Reply to  Julia Volpi
1 year ago

Hello Julia,
I’m not sure if my previous comment uploaded, however we decided to use 3mm thick titanium disks for a number of reasons. First, we initially started this experiment with coated glass plates, however we did not see HA growth as expected on the samples. By switching to titanium, we allowed similar HA deposition to occur as it would in the mouth since titanium is commonly used for implants. We cut the initial 9mm rod into separate 3mm disks which gave us leeway to polish the samples without them becoming too thin, and to allow for enough surface area for HA growth in the SBF.

Tatiana Aviles
Tatiana Aviles (@guest_7772)
Reply to  Julia Volpi
1 year ago

Hello Julia,
I’m not sure if my previous comment uploaded, however we decided to use 3mm thick titanium disks for a number of reasons. First, we initially started this experiment with coated glass plates, however we did not see HA growth as expected on the samples. By switching to titanium, we allowed similar HA deposition to occur as it would in the mouth since titanium is commonly used for implants. We cut the initial 9mm rod into separate 3mm disks which gave us leeway to polish the samples without them becoming too thin, and to allow for enough surface area for HA growth in the SBF.

Tatiana Aviles
Tatiana Aviles (@guest_7774)
Reply to  Julia Volpi
1 year ago

Hello Julia,
I’m not sure if my previous comment uploaded, however we decided to use 3mm thick titanium disks for a number of reasons. First, we initially started this experiment with coated glass plates, however we did not see HA growth as expected on the samples. By switching to titanium, we allowed similar HA deposition to occur as it would in the mouth since titanium is commonly used for implants. We cut the initial 9mm rod into separate 3mm disks which gave us leeway to polish the samples without them becoming too thin, and to allow for enough surface area for HA growth in the SBF.

Tatiana Aviles
Tatiana Aviles (@guest_7776)
Reply to  Julia Volpi
1 year ago

Hello Julia,
I’m not sure if my previous comment uploaded, however we decided to use 3mm thick titanium disks for a number of reasons. First, we initially started this experiment with coated glass plates, however we did not see HA growth as expected on the samples. By switching to titanium, we allowed similar HA deposition to occur as it would in the mouth since titanium is commonly used for implants. We cut the initial 9mm rod into separate 3mm disks which gave us leeway to polish the samples without them becoming too thin, and to allow for enough surface area for HA growth in the SBF.

Tatiana Aviles
Tatiana Aviles (@guest_7778)
Reply to  Julia Volpi
1 year ago

Hello Julia,
I’m not sure if my previous comment uploaded, however we decided to use 3mm thick titanium disks for a number of reasons. First, we initially started this experiment with coated glass plates, however we did not see HA growth as expected on the samples. By switching to titanium, we allowed similar HA deposition to occur as it would in the mouth since titanium is commonly used for implants. We cut the initial 9mm rod into separate 3mm disks which gave us leeway to polish the samples without them becoming too thin, and to allow for enough surface area for HA growth in the SBF.

Elena Yarmola
Elena Yarmola (@guest_2760)
1 year ago

Nice work!

John Livingston
John Livingston (@guest_3186)
1 year ago

Great job! You layed out your information very nicely!

Eshani Shah
Eshani Shah (@guest_3618)
1 year ago

Great work! While shadowing dentists, I’ve noticed patients return due to implant failure. While it can be due to poor oral hygiene, implant material is a major contributor to how a patient’s oral flora will react. I understand you were able to mimic the environment through the use of hydroxyapatite, did you consider any other independent factors?

Tatiana Aviles
Tatiana Aviles (@guest_7768)
Reply to  Eshani Shah
1 year ago

Hello Eshani,
So we have considered many other factors regarding this experiment as we progressed through the study. For example, we used simulated body fluid which mimics the ion concentrations in blood plasma, however we’ve begun to wonder if artificial saliva would have a similar affect. We’ve also wanted to test how gravity can affect crystal formation on the surfaces and how strongly the HA growth on the coatings adhere.