Shinichi Someya, Associate Professor of Aging and Geriatric Research

Mentor
Shinichi Someya, Associate Professor of Aging and Geriatric Research
Project Title
Role of Inter-organelle communication in hearing loss
College
College of Medicine
Time Commitment
6-10 hours/week
Method
Depends on lab funding Research Credit Unpaid with future paid opportunities
Location of Research
On-Campus
Possible Co-Authorship
Yes

Project Description

The Someya Lab (http://someyalab.aging.ufl.edu/about-someya-lab/) studies the molecular mechanisms that underlie cochlear aging, mitochondrial dysfunction, and hearing loss in the Department of Aging & Geriatric Research in the College of Medicine at the University of Florida. Our work employs molecular genetics tools to identify the genes and pathways involved in aging and mitochondrial dysfunction. These studies are complemented by the use of electrophysiology and histology to assess auditory function and cochlear pathology. We use mice as a model system because the mouse inner ear is anatomically similar to that of human and the homologies between the mouse and human genomes are well-established. Our research focuses on the role of inter-organelle communication (mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum) in the maintenance of cochlear hair cell function and how altered inter-organelle communication influences the progression of hearing loss. We are also interested in understanding the roles of sex chromosomes and hormones in auditory function.

Additional Requirements
None

Contact Information

Email Address
someya@ufl.edu
Phone Number
2945167
  • someya@ufl.edu
  • 2945167
  • The Someya Lab (http://someyalab.aging.ufl.edu/about-someya-lab/) studies the molecular mechanisms that underlie cochlear aging, mitochondrial dysfunction, and hearing loss in the Department of Aging & Geriatric Research in the College of Medicine at the University of Florida. Our work employs molecular genetics tools to identify the genes and pathways involved in aging and mitochondrial dysfunction. These studies are complemented by the use of electrophysiology and histology to assess auditory function and cochlear pathology. We use mice as a model system because the mouse inner ear is anatomically similar to that of human and the homologies between the mouse and human genomes are well-established. Our research focuses on the role of inter-organelle communication (mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum) in the maintenance of cochlear hair cell function and how altered inter-organelle communication influences the progression of hearing loss. We are also interested in understanding the roles of sex chromosomes and hormones in auditory function.

  • None