Hannah Kim

Hannah Kim

Mentor

Dr. Rae X. Yan

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Major

English and Psychology

Minor

Philosophy

Organizations

Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, Kappa Delta Sorority, Florida Social Cognition and Emotion Lab

Academic Awards

University Scholar, Dean's List, Bright Futures Academic Scholar

Volunteering

Positive Feedback Mentorship; Kappa Delta Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee; Alachua County Crisis Center

Research Interests

Civil Rights, American History, Race Relations, Social Justice

Hobbies and Interests

Traveling, creative writing, painting, cooking, and fitness

Research Project

Race Relations between the Black and Asian American Communities in America

One of the more contentious topics in the analysis of critical race studies is the division between the Black and Asian American community. The question of how Asian Americans have aggravated the gap in the American racial division has been widely debated, with scholars such as Yang arguing that complicity is to blame. The lack of meaningful dialogue on this division has led to an overall shortage of reliable and scholarly material to expand on and I will address these missing aspects in the current literature.

In my project, I will look at popular and contemporary works from the Civil Rights Era of the 1950s to the present. I will examine the history of the slogan “Yellow Peril Supports Black Power” to contextualize a series of events including the Vietnam War and L.A. Riots, explore how the model minority myth has been used as a racial wedge through articles such as “Success Story, Japanese-American Style,” reflect on the representation of the contentious relationship between Black and Asian people in films such as Spike Lee’s Da 5 Bloods, and discuss my own experiences and “purgatorial status” that has influenced the way I see the race issues in America. Through this project, I assess why Black and Asian American groups are unable to overcome differences despite the ways they are similarly defined and discriminated against and hope to emphasize the ways in which people can comfortably unify by engaging in difficult, candid discussions. 

  • Dr. Rae X. Yan
  • English and Psychology
  • Philosophy
  • Civil Rights, American History, Race Relations, Social Justice
  • University Scholar, Dean's List, Bright Futures Academic Scholar
  • Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, Kappa Delta Sorority, Florida Social Cognition and Emotion Lab
  • Positive Feedback Mentorship; Kappa Delta Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee; Alachua County Crisis Center
  • Traveling, creative writing, painting, cooking, and fitness
  • Race Relations between the Black and Asian American Communities in America
  • One of the more contentious topics in the analysis of critical race studies is the division between the Black and Asian American community. The question of how Asian Americans have aggravated the gap in the American racial division has been widely debated, with scholars such as Yang arguing that complicity is to blame. The lack of meaningful dialogue on this division has led to an overall shortage of reliable and scholarly material to expand on and I will address these missing aspects in the current literature.

    In my project, I will look at popular and contemporary works from the Civil Rights Era of the 1950s to the present. I will examine the history of the slogan “Yellow Peril Supports Black Power" to contextualize a series of events including the Vietnam War and L.A. Riots, explore how the model minority myth has been used as a racial wedge through articles such as “Success Story, Japanese-American Style,” reflect on the representation of the contentious relationship between Black and Asian people in films such as Spike Lee’s Da 5 Bloods, and discuss my own experiences and “purgatorial status” that has influenced the way I see the race issues in America. Through this project, I assess why Black and Asian American groups are unable to overcome differences despite the ways they are similarly defined and discriminated against and hope to emphasize the ways in which people can comfortably unify by engaging in difficult, candid discussions.