Jillian Zuwala

Jillian Zuwala

Mentor

Yonghee Oh, Ph.D.

College

College of Public Health and Health Professions

Major

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Minor

Deaf and Hearing Sciences

Organizations

National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA), Theatre Strike Force, UF Honors College

Academic Awards

N/A

Volunteering

N/A

Research Interests

Psychoacoustics, Auditory Computation

Hobbies and Interests

Reading, writing, traveling, embroidering, improv comedy

Research Project

Interaction between pitch and timbre cues on auditory stream segregation and grouping.

When a listening environment contains multiple different sounds coming from multiple different sources, they often blend together and become messy, indecipherable noise. Listeners can use various auditory cues, such as pitch and timbre, to focus their attention onto just one sound, effectively drowning out the background noise. This is known as the “cocktail party effect.”  For individuals with normal hearing, this phenomenon occurs effortlessly—but for those with hearing impairments, isolating one sound from a noisy environment is much more challenging. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction of pitch and timbre cues in an auditory streaming segregation task and determine to what extent listeners with various hearing capabilities utilize these cues in a multi-talker listening environment.

  • Yonghee Oh, Ph.D.
  • Communication Sciences and Disorders
  • Deaf and Hearing Sciences
  • Psychoacoustics, Auditory Computation
  • N/A
  • National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA), Theatre Strike Force, UF Honors College
  • N/A
  • Reading, writing, traveling, embroidering, improv comedy
  • Interaction between pitch and timbre cues on auditory stream segregation and grouping.
  • When a listening environment contains multiple different sounds coming from multiple different sources, they often blend together and become messy, indecipherable noise. Listeners can use various auditory cues, such as pitch and timbre, to focus their attention onto just one sound, effectively drowning out the background noise. This is known as the “cocktail party effect.”  For individuals with normal hearing, this phenomenon occurs effortlessly—but for those with hearing impairments, isolating one sound from a noisy environment is much more challenging. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction of pitch and timbre cues in an auditory streaming segregation task and determine to what extent listeners with various hearing capabilities utilize these cues in a multi-talker listening environment.