Kiersten Meigs

Kiersten Meigs

Mentor

Dr. Zachary Slepian

College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Major

Astrophysics

Minor

Mathematics, Botany, Zoology

Organizations

N/A

Academic Awards

N/A

Volunteering

N/A

Research Interests

Cosmology, relativity and gravitation, quantum theory, and astrobiology

Hobbies and Interests

SCUBA diving, playing guitar, traveling

Research Project

Resolving Integrals of Products of Spherical Bessel Functions with Arbitrary Power Laws into Singular Distributions

Integrals of products of spherical Bessel functions often appear in cosmological computations, for example, when transforming the theory power spectrum into configuration space to model galaxy survey data, or evaluating higher-point correlation functions. These types of integrals frequently arise in cosmological perturbation theory, which helps model galaxy clustering in cosmological surveys with large data sets such as DESI, as well as in computing covariance matrices, which help optimally weight data when comparing to the model. These integrals are usually evaluated using numerical methods, but finding analytical solutions to these integrals can accelerate current computational methods. We are developing a method for finding analytical solutions of these integrals by using a differential operator that can alter the powers of the integrands by steps of two.

  • Dr. Zachary Slepian
  • Astrophysics
  • Mathematics, Botany, Zoology
  • Cosmology, relativity and gravitation, quantum theory, and astrobiology
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • SCUBA diving, playing guitar, traveling
  • Resolving Integrals of Products of Spherical Bessel Functions with Arbitrary Power Laws into Singular Distributions
  • Integrals of products of spherical Bessel functions often appear in cosmological computations, for example, when transforming the theory power spectrum into configuration space to model galaxy survey data, or evaluating higher-point correlation functions. These types of integrals frequently arise in cosmological perturbation theory, which helps model galaxy clustering in cosmological surveys with large data sets such as DESI, as well as in computing covariance matrices, which help optimally weight data when comparing to the model. These integrals are usually evaluated using numerical methods, but finding analytical solutions to these integrals can accelerate current computational methods. We are developing a method for finding analytical solutions of these integrals by using a differential operator that can alter the powers of the integrands by steps of two.