Mia Johnson

Mia Johnson

Mentor

Jacqueline Hobbs, M.D., Ph.D.

College

College of Medicine

Major

Biochemistry

Minor

Spanish

Organizations

N/A

Academic Awards

N/A

Volunteering

N/A

Research Interests

Psychiatry

Hobbies and Interests

Reading, running, traveling

Research Project

Evaluating the Risk of Psychiatric Illness Following COVID-19 Infection

Currently, there are no known definitive causes of psychiatric disorders, but rather various risk factors; these determinants can be induced by nature, nurture, or an amalgamation of both. Understudied potential contributors to psychiatric illness are viral infections. Viruses can interfere with neurodevelopmental processes, thus increasing vulnerability to abnormal functioning. The prevalence of neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients, in addition to growing evidence that the disease can, directly and indirectly, affect neurons and neuroglia, supports that COVID-19 can have lasting consequences on the structure and function of the brain, thus enhancing susceptibility to psychiatric illness. This project is a systematic review that seeks to determine plausible mechanisms that COVID-19 infection can contribute to psychiatric disorders, which disorders are more probable, and the likeliness of long-term psychiatric consequences. It will also aim to identify COVID-19-specific risk factors and vulnerable groups. Throughout the project, research will be centralized to susceptible populations, which can be classified by sex, race, age, family history, health conditions (e.g., pregnancy, previous mental illness, past viral infections), etc. The objective is an all-inclusive understanding of the connection between COVID-19 infection and mental illness. 

  • Jacqueline Hobbs, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Biochemistry
  • Spanish
  • Psychiatry
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • Reading, running, traveling
  • Evaluating the Risk of Psychiatric Illness Following COVID-19 Infection
  • Currently, there are no known definitive causes of psychiatric disorders, but rather various risk factors; these determinants can be induced by nature, nurture, or an amalgamation of both. Understudied potential contributors to psychiatric illness are viral infections. Viruses can interfere with neurodevelopmental processes, thus increasing vulnerability to abnormal functioning. The prevalence of neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients, in addition to growing evidence that the disease can, directly and indirectly, affect neurons and neuroglia, supports that COVID-19 can have lasting consequences on the structure and function of the brain, thus enhancing susceptibility to psychiatric illness. This project is a systematic review that seeks to determine plausible mechanisms that COVID-19 infection can contribute to psychiatric disorders, which disorders are more probable, and the likeliness of long-term psychiatric consequences. It will also aim to identify COVID-19-specific risk factors and vulnerable groups. Throughout the project, research will be centralized to susceptible populations, which can be classified by sex, race, age, family history, health conditions (e.g., pregnancy, previous mental illness, past viral infections), etc. The objective is an all-inclusive understanding of the connection between COVID-19 infection and mental illness.