CURE: Engineering Undergraduate Research: Investigation of Stromal Vascular Fraction Neovessel Integration with Intact Networks

Investigation of Stromal Vascular Fraction Neovessel Integration with Intact Networks

CURE: Engineering Undergraduate Research: Investigation of Stromal Vascular Fraction Neovessel Integration with Intact Networks

Student Presenters

Sadat Kasem, Alexandra Kirkner, Sarah Scott, Yvette N. Zerry

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Walter Murfee

College

Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering

Abstract

Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF) is a heterogenous collection of cells derived from adipose tissue containing multiple cell types. SVF is of particular interest to research into angiogenesis, or the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. SVF has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, implicating it in the development of treatments for age-related diseases and degenerative pathologies, including diabetic retinopathy, cardiac ischemia, and peripheral arterial disease. What remains unknown is the extent to which SVF is able to self-assemble into new networks and how these networks may differ from those formed by existing natural mechanisms. The specific objective of this project will be to determine the microvascular density of stromal vascular fraction derived neovasculature versus nearby angiogenic host networks. Mesentery tissues and inguinal fat were harvested from adult Wistar rats. SVF was isolated from the fat and deposited onto the mesenteries which were then cultured for 3 days ex-vivo with MEM supplemented with 10% serum. Tissues were fixed in methanol and labeled with PECAM to identify endothelial cells. Images from 2 experimental groups (mesentery with and without SVF). Connectivity was quantified by counting the number of connected segments per field of view. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of SVF-supplemented tissues to form vascular networks like those of existing systems. The data and observations from this study could also support future applications of SVF-based therapies. Differences in the microvascular structure caused by the SVF could support the viability of SVF as a regenerative therapeutic cell population.

Poster

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